'Articles and Newsletters'

Stream School for Kids!

Apr 20th, 2016 by News from the Little River

Save the Date! Our Stream School for Kids is a free program for kids of all ages and it’s fast approaching. We will have experts in the field of water quality and stream ecology identifying critters and teaching everyone a thing or two about the Little River. These classes fill up fast, so register by sending an e-mail to  snaildarter@littleriverwatershed.org with the name, number, age, and t-shirt size of kids who will be participating. No phone calls please!

August 13 is our last Stream School open to the public, and will be held at Whispering River RV Resort. There are two sessions per day (9 a.m. – noon OR 1 p.m. – 5 p.m.), but the afternoon session is currently full.

Bring the whole family, and we’ll see you on the river!

ssfk

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Six Legs and a Buzz Book Signing and Musical Celebration

Mar 15th, 2016 by News from the Little River

SixLegsandaBuzzPoster2Rikki Hall was an advocate for the Little River. He also was a gifted writer and photographer. His family has published a book of writings and photographs, with proceeds going to Little River Watershed Association. The book is called Six Legs and a Buzz. More about the book signing and music celebration here:

https://www.facebook.com/events/1960420220850867/

 

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2014 End of Year Newsletter

Nov 28th, 2014 by News from the Little River

Our 2014 Newsletter is available.  Read about the work of our staff and volunteers here:

Streamlines2014_V13_web

And consider making an annual donation here!

ONLINE DONATION

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Make an online donation here.

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Little River Watershed Association Receives Tennessee Parks and Greenways Connections Award

Nov 16th, 2013 by News from the Little River

The Little River Watershed Association was awarded a $2500 grant through the Tennessee Park and Greenways Connections small grants program to create a Blueways map of the Little River, including areas that are accessible along the Little River to kayakers, canoers and tubers. Sponsored by the Tennessee Parks and Greenways Foundation, this grant program helps fund greenway or trail projects connecting nearby communities to or near Tennessee’s beautiful state parks or natural areas.

Since 1999 the Tennessee State Park Connections program has awarded over 191 grants statewide totaling over $300,000. The funding for this 2013 Tennessee Parks and Greenways Connection grant was generously provided by Tennessee Parks and Greenways Foundation. “This funding will help us be able to educate residents and tourists about the Little River’s history, where best to put-in and take-out personal watercraft, and explain how the watershed works and why it is important to protect,” said Kim Raia, board chair for the Little River Watershed Association.

The Tennessee Parks and Greenways Foundation’s mission is to protect Tennessee ‘s natural treasures. They are dedicated to preserving Tennessee’s scenic beauty and rich wildlife by creating an interconnected system of parks, greenways, and wildlife areas from the Mighty Mississippi River to the Great Smoky Mountains. Kathleen Williams, President and Executive Director, realizes that to accomplish such an ambitious goal requires more than just a dedicated Board of Directors and hard-working staff.

“We continually look for ways to maximize oureffectiveness through partnerships and collaborative efforts with others. By giving away smallgrants each year to others, we stimulate big projects that contribute to our mission. Another strategy to accomplish our mission is to purchase and protect scenic properties throughout Tennessee which began in 1998 with protection of 419 acres in Fall Creek Falls State Park, and most recently the protection of 211 acres at Cummins Falls which became Tennessee’s 54th StatePark in May 2012.” Williams added.

For more information on the Foundation, visit www.tenngreen.org.

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LRWA Open House at Vienna Coffee

Nov 16th, 2013 by News from the Little River

LRWA is creating a Blueways Map of the Little River, partially funded by the Tennessee Parks and Greenways Foundation. The map will include public access locations, history of the Little River, identification of public and private land, river safety, and stewardship of the river and its watershed. On December 3rd, we will be hosting an open house for our friends and for community members who are interested in sharing stories and history of the Little River Watershed for us to include. Tennessee Parks and Greenways Foundation will present a check to LRWA during the event.

The open house will be held at 4:00pm on December 3rd at Vienna Coffee House, 212 College Street Maryville, TN 37804.

Please RSVP to snaildarter@littleriverwatershed.org or (865)980-2130. Space is limited.

 

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LRWA Receives Support from Our Community!

Nov 10th, 2013 by News from the Little River

 

TVA Supports LRWA Stewardship Efforts

On October 5th, 25 people turned out to remove litter from the stretches of river we adopted as part of Blount County’s Adopt-a-Stream Program.  We tackled a 4-mile stretch of Little River in Walland, as well as our newly adopted section of Pistol Creek along the Alcoa Greenway.

TVA joined us to help clean along the Alcoa Greenway and present a $2500 donation to support river stewardship. Thank you TVA!

First Annual Protect & Paddle Makes a Splash 

Proceeds from the first annual Protect & Paddle netted over $2,300 for LRWA.

Mark Hartsoe, along with sponsors River Sports Outfitters, River John’s Island, Saw Works Brewing Co., and The Market at Washington & High all helped pull together a first-ever paddling fundraiser for nearly 130 people on September 8.
The group float lasted about 3 hrs, ending at River John’s island. Participants enjoyed food, libations and music of local band Sunshine Station.

From left to right: Mark Hartsoe (Hartsoe Law Firm), John Mollish (River John’s Island), Will Sherrod (Saw Works Brewing Co.), Kim Raia (LRWA), Mike Adams (The Market), and Laura Jones (River Sports Outfitters).

UT AWRA Fundraiser

The Student Chapter of the American Water Resources Association at the University of Tennessee presented LRWA with a $200 check.  In April, the AWRA hosted a screening of the Robert Redford filmWatershed to benefit three organizations: Legacy Parks Foundation, the Water Quality Forum, and LRWA.

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TWRA Grant

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency awarded LRWA $1000 for cleanups and community events.  LRWA will purchase stream waders for cleanups, stream monitoring, and education events.

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December News from the Little River Watershed Association

Dec 13th, 2012 by News from the Little River
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News from the LIttle River Watershed Association

December 2012

LRWA Logo

UPCOMING GREENWAYS MEETING:

Alcoa GreenwayBridge We’d like to help spread the word about a Greenway information meeting taking place this Thursday December 6that the Blount County library. Participants will have a chance to provide input on the future greenway plans for this area and to learn more about the benefits these connected trail systems provide for our community.The meeting will be held from 5-7 PM, December 6th at the Blount County Public Library, Sharon Lawson Room, 508 North Cusick Street, Maryville. This information session is sponsored by Plan East Tennessee, the Great Smoky Mountain Greenway Council and the Knoxville Regional TPO.

  
See our website link here to learn more about the meeting on the 6th, or click here to learn more about Great Smoky Mountain Greenway Council and regional plans for our the Knox/Blount County area. 
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Adopt a Stream on December 1st, a Success!

Adopt a StreamOn December 1st, 15 people turned out to remove  litter from the 4-mile stretch of river we have adopted as part of Blount County’s Adopt a Stream Program.  The watershed association would also like to adopt a section of Pistol Creek in Alcoa in 2013.  

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Foggy October morning near Townsend.

Save the dates: March 9th, Winter Gala @ the Clayton Center for the Arts.

Little River Watershed Website

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Thanks to The Market at Washington and High for hosting a fundraiser for Little River Watershed Association!

On November 15th we held a small fundraiser at our faboulous Maryville Market at Washington and High. 47 people bought a barbeque dinner and a couple of brews to support the watershed association. We’d like to thank Mike and the gang at the Market for supporting us and providing such a great place to stop in after a hike in the Smokies or a trip down the river.The event also provided the opportunity for us to hang out with new and old watershed supportors.  We”re looking forward to repeating the event again in the near future!


Love the Little River?  We need your help…

Kiss a fish

The LRWA Board of Directors just completed our yearly strategic planning session and would like very much to have your help implementing new programs and events in 2013. Do you have time or talents you would like to volunteer in 2013?

We need your help! Please contact us at snaildarter@littleriverwatershed.org.

The mission of the Little River Watershed Association is to foster stewardship and conservation of the Little River and its watershed.

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September Newsletter

Oct 2nd, 2012 by News from the Little River

 Fall Adopt-A-Stream

When: September 29, 8:30am – 12pm

Where: Meet at 8:15 at 5396 Old Walland Hwy at the picnic tables.

We will be focusing on clean-up along the banks of the river. The clean-up will begin at 8:30 AM and last about 3.5 hours. If you want to canoe or kayak on the Little River that day, we can mark trash drop off locations along the route. LRWA will not be providing boats or shuttling service, but boaters can check in and pick up trash bags and instructions.

What you need:

It is recommended to wear long pants, closed toed shoes or boots. Gloves will be provided, but if you have a favorite pair of work gloves bring them along. Children under 18 will need to be accompanied by an adult.

Directions:

From Hwy 321 turn onto Old Walland Hwy between the volunteer fire station and the Walland Center/ BP/ Post Office. Cross over the Walland Bridge, the meeting location is on the right.

Sign-Up:

Call the office at 980.2130 or email us at

snaildarter@littleriverwatershed.org

Please check your email or visit our website before the clean-Up for any last minute modifications due to weather. We will cancel the event if there is inclement weather or high water. We hope you can join us!

Save the Date for the next LRWA FUNdraiser

Where: The Market at Washington & High

When: Thursday, November 15, 5pm

Cost: $12

A chance to mingle with friends and enjoy a pulled pork sandwich with southern sides with reduced priced beers. Proceeds will benefit Little River Watershed Association.

Hemlock Treatment Scheduled for October

In early October, the LRWA will treat hemlock trees along the Little River with landowners’ permission. The goal is to save the trees, which are currently threatened by infestation from the hemlock woolly adelgid. The Eastern Hemlock is a tree that provides natural habitat for migrating birds and critical shade for river dwellers. The presence of hemlocks has a direct impact on stream biodiversity.

 AmeriCorps Volunteer Caitlin Hoy Joins LRWA

The Little River Watershed Association is pleased to announce that Caitlin Hoy has joined the organization as an AmeriCorps Volunteer. Originally from Audubon, Pennsylvania, a suburb west of Philadelphia, Hoy attended Gettysburg College and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in environmental studies and biology with a concentration in marine and freshwater ecology, and a minor in music. She then moved to Columbia, South Carolina to continue her education in marine science. After a year of graduate work, she decided to join AmeriCorps, which requires dedicating a year of service to helping community needs. She is excited about joining the Little River Watershed Association in their efforts to educate the community through outreach, volunteer involvement and watershed assessment. “I hope to help the community understand the connection between watershed health and their individual behaviors,” she said.

LRWA Welcomes Four New Board Members

The Little River Watershed Association is pleased to announce the addition of four new board members. Each board member is committed to serving two years with the LRWA as volunteers. “The Little River Watershed Association is run by a committed board with diverse talents to help us carry out our mission,” said Kim Raia, Chair. “Board members are involved in everything that we do, from quarterly Adopt-A-Stream cleanups to grant writing to planning the annual winter fundraiser.”

Jeanie Hilten, resident of Blount County for 26 years, has devoted her work and play to the celebration of nature and its power to enrich human lives. Recent positions have been with Great Smoky Mountains Institute at Tremont, Discover Life in America’s biodiversity program, and Townsend Visitors Center festivals and special events. Her interest in serving on the Little River Watershed Board is driven by appreciation of the beauty and productivity of our region’s streams and their important contribution to quality of life for people. Recognizing the environmental, economic, and recreational values of clean water, Jeanie is excited about the prospects of the Watershed Association’s role in protecting the Little River now and in the future. Jeanie enjoys bringing people together for adventures in exploration and discovery, and guiding the many and varied skills of those involved toward the goals of stewardship and conservation. Hobbies and interests include gardening, banjo-playing, fiber arts, hiking, canoeing, and travel.

John Lamb was born in Oak Ridge and raised in North Knox County, and has lived in Blount County for the last 17 years where has served as Director of the Blount County Planning Department. He became interested in serving on the Little River Watershed Association Board from work on the Blount County Water Quality Plan and membership in the Little River Water Quality Forum. Other current work includes Board Chair of the Blount County Environmental Health Action Team, and Vice-President of the East Tennessee Quality Growth Board. He is also member of the Knoxville Regional Transportation Planning Organization Technical Committee, Plan East Tennessee Community Leadership Team, Stock Creek Industrial Park Design Review Committee, and Blount County Solid Waste Authority Board. When not working, he likes cooking, internet surfing, yard sales, science fiction, and classic movies.

Denise Moseley has lived in South Knoxville for most of her life, and has worked at SunTrust Bank as Vice President since 1997. “I am interested in preserving the beauty of East Tennessee and love being outdoors,” said Mosely. “I hope to utilize my financial background and social activities to create an impact for the association both financially and educationally.” In her spare time, Mosely enjoys traveling, gardening and the arts.

Kim Trevathan has resided in Blount County for 17 years. He is a published author and assistant professor of writing at Maryville College, where he’s taught writing for 11 years. “I got interested in the board because I care about the conservation and protection of the Little River, so vital to the spiritual, cultural, and physical health our community,” said Trevathan. “I wanted to get involved in projects that will educate people about the importance of the river and keeping it clean and healthy.” His forthcoming book entitled Liminal Zones: Where Lakes End and Rivers Begin will be published by the University of Tennessee press in 2013, and chronicles a series of upstream quests toward the places where dammed reservoirs give way to the current of the rivers that feed them.

Boy Scout Troop Day on the River

On Sat. Sept. 8, eleven boys from Boy Scout Troop 888 met at Coulter’s Bridge for an array of water monitoring activities provided by LRWA. The purpose was to create an educational STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Math) experience incorporating environmental, chemical and aquatic sciences and stream flow mathematics. The experience with water monitoring was also important for to offer Scouts exposure to a variety of professionals working in environmental careers.

To begin the slate of activities, the group set out to measure the river flow with a scientists’ toolbox of calculator, meter tape, stopwatches and rubber duckies to time the velocity of the stream. These activities were used as the basis for discussion of implications for bridge design and property development and technology in the chemistry tests.

Next up was a fish survey using seine nets, an activity led by Jon Mollish, LRWA board member and biologist for TVA. The troop was able to observe a good sampling of the 50 species found in Little River such as darters and crayfish, and were surprised to learn that the Little River has colorful fish rivaling those found on salt water coral reefs.

The Scouts then split into groups for a macroinvertebrate survey, using magnifying glasses, tweezers and a macroinvertebrate ID chart. They found larvae of mayflies, stoneflies, water pennies, caddisflies, hellgrammites (dobsonflies), dragonflies, as well as crayfish, whirligig beetles and snails. The boys learned that macroinvertebrates can help assess the quality of the river, since some are very sensitive to pollution. Based on the organisms they collected, including the large number of the most sensitive groups of macroinvertebrates, the boys concluded that the river is very clean.

Finally, the Scouts tested the water ph. The group used a simple test where a chemical indicator was added to the water sample and the resultant color change was compared to a chart. The results varied, but were all in the 7 to 8 range, indicating good water quality. In fact, the water tests all indicated quality of good to excellent that day, which seemed to generally be the case (comparing to TDEC historical data) for the components that were tested.

The troop had faced the day with a forecast of 95 percent chance of rain, but no one was dissuaded. Scout leader, David Wilburn, repeats a saying they have in their troop: “We don’t get rained out, only rained upon.” Fortunately for them, the rain held out until the very end.
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 The Little River Watershed Association is a 501C non-profit organization with the mission to protect, preserve, and enhance the Little River and its tributaries through mobilizing public support, building public awareness and promoting best management practices. The key aims of the Association are to promote educational activities that benefit the river and the watershed; to focus attention on efforts to protect the river; to distribute current information to the community; and to assist citizens in taking positive action.

Tel: (865) 980-2180

Email: Snaildarter@littleriverwatershed.org

 

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LRWA Announces New AmeriCorps Volunteer

Aug 28th, 2012 by News from the Little River

Caitlin Hoy joins Little River Watershed Association as an AmeriCorps volunteer

The Little River Watershed Association is pleased to announce that Caitlin Hoy has joined the organization as an AmeriCorps Volunteer. “It’s a great privilege to have Caitlin join us in our work to protect the Little River,” said Kim Raia, board chair. “We believe that her energy and enthusiasm will enhance our efforts to reach out to the community.”

Caitlin is originally from Audubon, Pennsylvania, a suburb west of Philadelphia. Sheattended Gettysburg College and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in environmental studies and biology with a concentration in marine and freshwater ecology, and a minor in music. She then moved to Columbia, South Carolina to continue her education in marine science. After a year of graduate work, she decided to join AmeriCorps, which requires dedicating a year of service to helping community needs.

For as long as she can remember, Caitlin has been interested in human impacts on the environment and what she could do to make a difference. During college, these interests escalated when she researched the effects of pharmaceuticals in the environment for her senior thesis. After sharing her results with the scientific community, she realized how important it was to bring this environmental awareness to the public through education. She is excited about joining the Little River Watershed Association in their efforts to educate the community through outreach, volunteer involvement and watershed assessment. “I hope to help the community understand the connection between watershed health and their individual behaviors,” she said.

Caitlin also enjoys playing the violin, going to the beach, fishing, and playing with her dog, Mako.

The Little River Watershed Association is a 501C non-profit organization with the mission to protect, preserve, and enhance the Little River and its tributaries through mobilizing public support, building public awareness and promoting best management practices. The key aims of the Association are to promote educational activities that benefit the river and the watershed; to focus attention on efforts to protect the river; to distribute current information to the community; and to assist citizens in taking positive action.

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Early May E-Newsletter

May 9th, 2012 by News from the Little River

Our May Newsletter is Posted!

http://hosted-p0.vresp.com/844819/8e939da81f/ARCHIVE

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Early April E-Newsletter

Apr 9th, 2012 by News from the Little River

Our Early April Newsletter is Posted!
https://app.verticalresponse.com/app/emails/email/view/357126191#view_as_html

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Officers from the US Air Base volunteer with LRWA

Mar 25th, 2011 by News from the Little River

LRWA would like to extend our thanks and appreciation to the officers from the US Air Base for a successful clean up in the Spring Brook Park area this last weekend.

We had 14 officers spend several hours on Saturday morning scrambling through thick brush, old fields and forested woodlands along Pistol Creek to remove hundreds of pounds of trash and debris. Mark Whited, Executive Director, said “they are some of the best volunteers we have had. We filled up over 40 large trash bags and removed 10 tires, 2 sinks, parts of 3 toilets, bicycle frame, car parts, a metal chair, 3 plastic buckets, water cooler, several garden hoses, tarps, linoleum flooring, styrofoam, a record player, TV and several hundred pounds of scrap metal.”  A final weight of all the trash and debris has not been calculated, but it was estimated  that about a 1000 lbs of debris was removed in a 1/2 mile section along Pistol Creek.  It appeared as though we may have found an old dump site, but most of the trash and debris floated in during periodic flooding events over the years. There were many piles of plastic bottles, glass bottles, cans that settled out in low spots amongst the trees as the water receded.

Officers from the US Air Base in Alcoa standing beside one of the many piles of trash and debris removed from along Pistol Creek.

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This Holiday, Give the Gift of Clean Water

Dec 16th, 2010 by News from the Little River

Dear Friends,

We know that the Friends of the Little River Watershed Association care about the environment and cherish the beauty of East Tennessee, specifically all that’s here in Blount County: the Smoky Mountains and the Little River that originates near the highest peaks. Whether you hike along the river banks, fish, swim or canoe the Little River, you know it’s a special place of rare beauty.

You may know that the LRWA is the *only* organization that serves as the voice of the Little River, but you may not know that the LRWA relies primarily on support from this community. We invite you to add your voice to those protecting the Little River because it needs your help. This holiday season, consider adding your voice to the community of friends who care about the future of the Little River by making a donation OR by suggesting the Little River Watershed Association to your friends and family if you would like them to donate in your name.

Whether you have tubed the river on a hot summer day or enjoy dipping your toes or dropping a fishing line in its beautiful blue-green water, please consider making a gift to support the programs of the LRWA today. We know that there are many causes competing for your donations, but in the spirit of holiday giving, your gift to the LRWA would be the greatest gift of all toward protecting our local water supply for future generations. Please visit our Web site to make a donation today:

www.littleriverwatershed.org

Thank You and Happy Holidays!

The LRWA Board of Directors

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Almost 20,000 Acres Proposed in the Tennessee Wilderness Act of 2010

Jun 10th, 2010 by News from the Little River

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

June 9, 2010

Jim Jeffries (Alexander) 202-224-8816

Laura Herzog (Corker) 202-224-3467

Alexander, Corker Introduce Bill to Designate Tennessee Wilderness
Legislation Would Preserve Six Areas Totaling 19,556 Acres in Cherokee National Forest

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senators Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) today introduced the Tennessee Wilderness Act of 2010 that would designate six different areas totaling 19,556 acres as wilderness in the Cherokee National Forest. These areas were recommended for wilderness status by the U.S. Forest Service in the development of its comprehensive 2004 forest plan and have been managed as Wilderness Study Areas since that time (a map of the proposed wilderness areas within the Cherokee National Forest can be found here).
“I grew up hiking in the mountains of East Tennessee and know firsthand that these beautiful landscapes should be preserved for generations to come,” Alexander said. “The bill we are introducing today is an important step in conserving some of the most pristine areas in Tennessee and will strengthen the legacy of Tennessee’s natural heritage.”
“We are blessed in East Tennessee with God-given amenities and an unparalleled natural environment, and the Cherokee National Forest is a prime example,” Corker said. “I thank Senator Alexander for his lifelong commitment to protecting scenic wilderness areas and am proud to join him in this effort to preserve Cherokee National Forest for future generations of Tennesseans and Americans to enjoy.”
Congress began protecting wilderness areas in the Cherokee National Forest in 1975, with additional wilderness areas being established by the Tennessee Wilderness Acts of 1984 and 1986.
The Tennessee Wilderness Act of 2010 specifically creates one new wilderness area and expands the boundaries of five separate existing wilderness areas already within the Cherokee National Forest. Since these areas are owned entirely by the U.S. Forest Service and are being managed as Wilderness Study Areas currently, this bill will have no effect on privately owned lands and will cause no change in access for the public.

The Tennessee Wilderness Act of 2010:

•   Creates the 9,038 acre Upper Bald River Wilderness (Monroe County)
•   Adds 348 acres to the Big Frog Wilderness (Polk County)
•   Adds 966 acres to the Little Frog Wilderness (Polk County)
•   Adds 2,922 acres to the Sampson Mountain Wilderness (Washington and Unicoi County)
•   Adds 4,446 acres to the Big Laurel Branch Wilderness (Carter and Johnson County)
•   Adds 1,836 acres to the Joyce Kilmer-Slickrock Wilderness (Monroe County)

Click Here for a Map of proposed areas for the Tennessee Wilderness Act of 2010

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Winter Newsletter Now Posted on Web

Feb 19th, 2010 by News from the Little River

Winter 2009 Newsletter-View As “PDF”


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Welcome to the New Little River Watershed Website

Mar 13th, 2009 by News from the Little River

Welcome to our website. We have been working very hard recently to bring you this whole new look with significantly expanded content. Our goal is to be your source of information about the Little River, it’s tributaries, and ways to protect this and other vital natural resources. We hope you find the tools and information you need to make informed decisions about the River and the community in which you live. The LaKota people in South Dakota follow a “seven generations” principle. Decisions on resource use are based on ensuring there will be enough for the next seven generations. The success of the Navajo and LaKota cultures were measured by the health of the people and their ability to sustain themselves generation after generation.

We hope our website will provide you with accurate and thought provoking information about the Little River Watershed and the community we live in.  We believe that an informed and engaged community are the key to making this one of the best places to live and play.

Please look around and let us know if there is information that you would like for us to include on our website . We will constantly be adding new content in the months to come and welcome any and all comments about how to bring our citizens the best product that we can.

Thanks for visiting. Come back often!

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Little River Watershed Announces New 2008 Board Members

Mar 1st, 2009 by News from the Little River

The Watershed Association added new board members in the fall on 2008.  Read more about these new folks here.

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Read Our Latest Newsletter

Feb 25th, 2009 by News from the Little River

Our last newsletter was a full page add in the Maryville Daily Times.  If you missed it, you can  catch up  by clicking on the following link:
Fall Newsletter

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